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"THE PAPERBOY" MOVIE REVIEW

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First off, the title of this movie is pretty deceiving. Not to be confused with that lovably difficult video game from the 80’s, nor a movie about a cute little kid who delivers papers – this movie is certainly not for everyone. I’d say it’s an intensely mature film and strictly for adults. 

The Paperboy” is a grim memoir of the accounts of Jack Janson (Zac Efron), based on a novel by Peter Dexter. Efron acts as a prodigious ex-swimmer who was kicked out of college for vandalism, has little-to-no friends, and resorts to being the neighbourhood paperboy. This movie wasn’t heavily marketed, however possesses a remarkable cast of acting talent. Matthew McConaughey plays the older brother to Zach Efron – a savvy reporter bent on uncovering the truth in completing a huge story. And rounding off the cast of exquisite performances includes Nicole Kidman as Charlotte Bless, John Cusack as Hillary Van Wetter, and Macy Gray as Anita Chester.

The cinematography (by Roberto Schaefer – famous for the likes of “The Quantum of Solace”) for this flick was very Southern and gloomy all throughout. It suited the pace of the film well, which starts off as a narration by Macy Gray, as the African American family housekeeper. I feel like there’s way too much to get into regarding the explanations of each and every character of in this story. Each was intriguing in their own twisted dark way.

To cut a long story short; Efron accompanies McConaughey and his partner to meet a woman (Kidman), who had fallen in love with a maniacal felon she had never met. Cusack is convicted for murdering a local sheriff and has been sentenced to death, but Kidman takes it upon herself to prove his innocence, approaching McConaughey in order to help her do so. As the story develops and becomes more and more complex Jack Janson falls in love with Bless, who is perhaps 20 years her senior.

“The Paperboy”, coming in at around 12.5 million USD, is considered a relatively low-budget production for today’s standards, but the production was of a very high standard. The pace of this film was pretty slow, but with reason. Classified partly as a drama and a thriller combined, I actually found the maturity of the content very refreshing. Although I never read the actual book, I felt that the story had some holes, perhaps due to the adaptations from book to screen, and I believe that an extra 30-45 minutes would be required to do the story justice.

I thoroughly enjoyed this movie, although I must reiterate, this movie IS NOT for everyone. Anyone expecting a happy ending – NOT HAPPENING. It’s the polar opposite of a comedy; a mature movie that’s is no doubt deserving of the mythical NC-17 rating. (On the side, I also saw “Killer Joe”, another NC-17 movie starring Matthew McConaughey, and I actually felt “The Paperboy” was more deserving of the maturity rating!)

I really liked this movie, so if you have a stomach for a dark-natured flick, definitely go see it!

 

– Christine Yau, IAFT

First off, the title of this movie is pretty deceiving. Not to be confused with that lovably difficult video game from the 80’s, nor a movie about a cute little kid who delivers papers – this movie is certainly not for everyone. I’d say it’s an intensely mature film and strictly for adults. 

The Paperboy” is a grim memoir of the accounts of Jack Janson (Zac Efron), based on a novel by Peter Dexter. Efron acts as a prodigious ex-swimmer who was kicked out of college for vandalism, has little-to-no friends, and resorts to being the neighbourhood paperboy. This movie wasn’t heavily marketed, however possesses a remarkable cast of acting talent. Matthew McConaughey plays the older brother to Zach Efron – a savvy reporter bent on uncovering the truth in completing a huge story. And rounding off the cast of exquisite performances includes Nicole Kidman as Charlotte Bless, John Cusack as Hillary Van Wetter, and Macy Gray as Anita Chester.

The cinematography (by Roberto Schaefer – famous for the likes of “The Quantum of Solace”) for this flick was very Southern and gloomy all throughout. It suited the pace of the film well, which starts off as a narration by Macy Gray, as the African American family housekeeper. I feel like there’s way too much to get into regarding the explanations of each and every character of in this story. Each was intriguing in their own twisted dark way.

To cut a long story short; Efron accompanies McConaughey and his partner to meet a woman (Kidman), who had fallen in love with a maniacal felon she had never met. Cusack is convicted for murdering a local sheriff and has been sentenced to death, but Kidman takes it upon herself to prove his innocence, approaching McConaughey in order to help her do so. As the story develops and becomes more and more complex Jack Janson falls in love with Bless, who is perhaps 20 years her senior.

“The Paperboy”, coming in at around 12.5 million USD, is considered a relatively low-budget production for today’s standards, but the production was of a very high standard. The pace of this film was pretty slow, but with reason. Classified partly as a drama and a thriller combined, I actually found the maturity of the content very refreshing. Although I never read the actual book, I felt that the story had some holes, perhaps due to the adaptations from book to screen, and I believe that an extra 30-45 minutes would be required to do the story justice.

I thoroughly enjoyed this movie, although I must reiterate, this movie IS NOT for everyone. Anyone expecting a happy ending – NOT HAPPENING. It’s the polar opposite of a comedy; a mature movie that’s is no doubt deserving of the mythical NC-17 rating. (On the side, I also saw “Killer Joe”, another NC-17 movie starring Matthew McConaughey, and I actually felt “The Paperboy” was more deserving of the maturity rating!)

I really liked this movie, so if you have a stomach for a dark-natured flick, definitely go see it!

 

– Christine Yau, IAFT

IAFT Cebu

IAFT Cebu

IAFT Cebu, Philippines is a film school that delivers an educational experience that reflects Hollywood roots and traditions. Founded in 2004, IAFT Cebu offers Certificate and Diploma programs in film , acting and 3D animation. Located in: One Hollywood Blvd
, Bigfoot I.T. and Media Park, Lapu-lapu City, Cebu, Philippines. Email: cebu-admissions@iaft.net, Contact Numbers: Globe/Viber: +63-917-314-3456 Smart: +63-947-991-9659 Phone: +63-32-495-2111